Last week we received a call regarding a failed backflow prevention device installed on a customer’s sprinkler system. One of their zone valves stuck on so they tried to shut off the irrigation mainline only to find that the valve handles had corroded away into rusty crumbles. I briefly met with the customer at his home, personally checked his backflow device, gave him our price to replace it. He agreed and we scheduled a time to get this work done.
Before

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State law now requires that an isolation valve and wye filter be installed upstream of any new backflow prevention device. The isolation valve provides a reliable means of shutting down your sprinkler system in the event of a zone valve failure or fractured mainline. The wye filter screens out debris in the water and insures uncontaminated operation of the check valves inside the backflow prevention device.

We carefully excavated the old device, taking care to preserve their lawn.

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We suspected that there was a leak in the area and, after some exploratory excavation, we found a small breach in the mainline just upstream of the backflow device. We completely cut out this section of pipe, replacing it with a new schedule 40 pipeline line that connected to our valves.

Here is the leak we located.

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We installed a heavy duty schedule 80, quarter-turn, isolation valve, a 1 inch brass wye filter, and a new double check assembly (DCA) backflow prevention device.

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We then tested the new device, installed new valve boxes, backfilled the dirt and turf and poured marble gravel into the bottom portion of the valve boxes.

We left their lawn looking like this.

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If you have any questions about replacing a backflow device, having it tested by certified backflow tester or obtaining a permit from the City please feel free to give us a call at 254-829-3800 or email us at info@rainstat.com. Thanks so much!

Drew Saylor

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